little girl enjoying music through earphones

fuelling the desire

The key to success boils down to 3 essentials: determination to succeed, correct practising, and acquiring good reading skills.

Let’s talk more about determination, or sticking to the task however long it takes. What we might call having grit.

I want to debunk straight away the myth that you are either musical or you are not; that you are either musically talented or not. ANYONE CAN LEARN TO PLAY THE PIANO.

So why do so many fail to learn to play this beautiful instrument?
The answer is complicated, but our 3 elements are at the root of the problem.

  1. Fuel the desire. Those of you who have read any self-help books or looked into the whys and where-fors of success, will know to first fuel DESIRE. Without desire there can be no goal-setting and no determination. So first fuel your child’s desire to learn piano. Make yours a musical family. Sing and dance, clap and move as well as listening to a variety of music. Watch people playing the piano on Youtube. Make enthusiastic noises.
  2. Now we are warming up to the idea, fuel the desire by encouraging the goal setting and commitment. The commitment to learn to play should be open-ended, life long. The goal should be to become a good pianist, not necessarily in the professional sense, but to be the best possible. To decide to “try it for a year” is not good enough and doomed to failure.

The wonderful book by Michael Griffin, “Learning Strategies for Musical Success,” gives details of many studies that have been done measuring talent against hard work. Hard work wins out every time. In every case, child prodigies thought to be extremely gifted have found to have put in extraordinary amounts of practice. Mozart practised for hours from the age of 3. Tiffany Poon, the renowned prodigy who was awarded a schlorship to the Juillard School at the age of 8, played from the age of 2 and from the start of formal lessons at the age of 4.5 practised over 4 hours a day! She was also very curious about music. Encouraged by her parents, she developed the ability to concentrate for long periods of time at an early age. Yes, she may have been genetically more endowed, but it was her dedication and grit that lead to success.

And so it has proved for all professional players. Sheer hard work and persistence have been shown to be behind every success story. Child prodigies appear to be so brilliant because they are compared with children of their own age, not people who have put in the same number of practice hours. The magical number of 10,000 hours seems to apply, with  professionals clocking up well over 10,000 hours of practice, competent amateurs at least 8,000 and so on.

preteen girl thinking

dreaming, thinking

In his book, Griffin also cites studies done comparing children who were told they were gifted and so had acquired a “fixed intelligence mindset,” with children not labelled talented or gifted but who had a strong desire to succeed. What was found was that the children with the fixed intelligence mindset assumed they would be able to everything easily, but were also reluctant to test themselves in case they were not as talented as they had been told. Children who believed in developing their potential were less worried by mistakes. When practising the same number hours it was the second set, those prepared to work to achieve their goals, who achieved the highest levels of success. Children who believe they are talented often have fixed ideas about their abilities and are less open to teaching and fresh ideas.

“In the investigation of superior achievement, precocity can be explained in terms of practice hours, opportunity, parental support, and a young starting age.”