Piano Readers

Music sight reading books

Our new reading books

This year I am introducing readers for the children. I have made many books by selecting pieces from other books and combining them into suitably graded readers. This is a lending library and it saves me lending out dozens of books. As I own all the books I’m pretty sure it is legal. I hope!!

I took the idea from school readers. Children from first days take home a reader every night and hey presto, pretty soon they are reading quite well and very soon very well and so on. You would be amazed if you knew that many children take years to learn to read music, which I assure you is a simpler process than learning to read stories. What goes wrong, I feel, is that children do not read enough music, so don’t quickly become familiar with music. So these readers are roughly graded and can be borrowed and enjoyed, then returned and changed within the same colour. Once a particular level becomes very easy it is time to go up to the next level. At this point I will hear a few pieces to make sure the child is ready to move up. Mostly I will give a few hints and leave this books to be enjoyed.

I’m hoping children will feel encouraged to explore, even pieces which may have unmet signs and challenges. They will not need to play every piece to me, so they may feel freer to explore and just have a go. The pieces are roughly themed and of a similar level but each book contains a variety of pieces and may vary in difficulty.

Yellow to Blue/Green cover first year to about Preliminary Grade ( that is equivalent to Grade 2 sight reading). Triple Yellow is stretching out and all the levels above are Grade 1 (Grade 3 sight reading) and up. You will notice that it is normal for a sight reading level to be approximately two grades below their actual ability level. These grades are of course piano grades and not school grades. For those unfamiliar with piano grading, there are 9 grades (Preliminary to Grade 8), Your child may take an exam at the end of each stage which is of a similar standard throughout the world. Preliminary exam is taken on average about 2 years after starting. Grade 8 is the final exam taken 8 to 10 years later by which stage your child will be a competent pianist.

It is important to realise that these readers are supposed to be easy to read and therefore should only be enjoyed at the end of normal practising (otherwise they will be playing way below their ability level!!) They are for enjoyment, and to show children that they are able to just pick up a book and read it. The world of music opens up! If children are struggling to read these readers the level is too high. It should not be a book to struggle over but one that can be read straight away. Hopeful also children will meet some music which they wouldn’t otherwise meet, and perhaps some old favourites from films, or that they have sung at school.

Please encourage your children to enjoy their readers. Show excitement and ask them to play a few pieces for you. Because while they are having fun, they will be improving their reading out of sight! Thank you.

Why play games in piano lessons?

Snakes and Ladders board

Learning music takes many forms

Here in Australia it is the second week of the teaching year. It is hot and steamy and the kids arrive tired and yawning from school. Really they just want to jump in the pool and cool off. What better way to make piano lessons the next best thing than to play a game or two in the air-conditioning?

Is that the only reason to play games? Not at all. In fact I wish that was what I was doing. Alas, caught on the hop as usual I am still not quite ready for the year. Why is the Christmas holiday never long enough? I have been making new music readers and grading them, making games, planning competitions, planning lessons. Phew! We are spending these first two weeks picking up the threads, checking nearly lost knowledge and forming our year plan. How much better if we could have done this through games. Well next week we will!

Yes, next week we will reinforce this knowledge through appropriate games and hands-on activities. And they won’t even know!!

I now make all my lessons 40 minutes, which gives ample time to cover theory, ear training, sight reading, rhythm and beat work, singing etc. without me feeling that I am neglecting areas. Games and activities using colourful materials allow this 40 minute lesson to be broken up into manageable sections which keep the brain firing.


What sort of games?

Board games, matching games, listening games, writing games, iPad games, hands-on……… whatever I can think of.

Preteen boy happily playing a video game

music apps

What do they teach?
  1. Names of notes
  2. Names of intervals
  3. Note values
  4. Rhythm and beat
  5. Keys
  6. Chords

In fact, just about any aspect of music can be taught through games or some fun activity. So if you are thinking “Why am I paying for my child to play games?’, understand that children learn quicker and more thoroughly through games. Games unlock the resistance about learning. Games make for quick learning because you have to know the rules to play. Games lead to easy success which is massively encouraging.

So dear friends. Never fear! As the year progresses I will be using more games in the lessons and maybe there will even be a few to take and play at home… along with the music readers……… but that’s another story.

What and How to Practise

mother and child at piano

learning to how to practise

Well here it is, the long awaited article of exactly how to practise. This is a biggie!!

We sign our child up for piano lessons and everything is happy ever after. Nope – it doesn’t work that way. Children have no idea how to practise. They may not touch the piano between lessons; or they fiddle about getting disheartened; or, if they are very keen, they will keep playing through their new piece hoping eventually it will sound right. Adult beginners are much the same. Sound familiar?

Did you know:

  • Children love it if you learn along with them and play together with them, duets or just the same notes. And don’t worry. If you are learning this can be very simple, but so much fun!
  • Success is achieved by a combination of quality and quantity. But at the start efforts may not be brilliant, so quantity may have to suffice until quality kicks in. Make sure your child has enough to practise to keep busy. Rote pieces can be great for this – yes, even chop-sticks!

 

lady playing piano with cat

Even adults need to learn to practise efficiently

  • Some children practise only one or two days for longer time, not realising that this strategy doesn’t work. Piano playing is a skill so half learning one day, forgetting, relearning the next day actually reenforces the process and gets best results. So at least 5 days a week to make good progress please.

For best results:

  1. Make sure your child knows what to practise – keep it simple – enjoy.
  2. Pieces should be practised in the head before playing. This saves children jumping in without thinking and is very successful.
  3. Longer pieces will probably have been broken into phrases by the teacher. Work on ONE phrase at a time. It doesn’t have to be the first phrase. I have been having great success by shutting the keyboard and helping the pupil memorise the piece before playing. This works so well if they really look. A phrase, if the right standard for them can be learned in as little as 5 minutes!!
  4. Repetition is an important part of learning. It needs to be done very deliberately to avoid mistakes creeping in. It should then be happily in long term memory, ready to call on when desired. I love this quote by Stephen Heller, a 19th century teacher and composer:

    The amateur practises until he gets it right. The professional practises until he cannot get it wrong.

To become a good practicer….. well you have to practise!

Why should my child practise?

Boy playing piano

starting to play

Let’s look at why practice is so necessary.

After years of teaching I know that to succeed in mastering the piano, three things are necessary:

  1. The determination to succeed
  2. Daily practice
  3. Good reading skills

If you are saying to your self, but my child doesn’t want to be a professional musician so there is no need to be practising long hours, you are only partly right.

Ponder these thoughts:

  1. How do you know that your child will not become super interested in music and want to take up music in some shape or form?
  2. Any amount of daily practice will give results if done regularly and with interest, but…
  3. Practice is only successful if it is done properly.

Children enjoy a challenge but most children don’t have a clue what they want to achieve or what to do at home.

This year I gave my students next year’s work before Christmas. Most welcomed the new challenges with great enthusiasm and couldn’t wait to get going. This suggests to me that the craving for new is a determining factor in the will to work. More about how to create interest in my next article. Let’s just talk a little about practice here.

  1. Your child should practise because playing the piano is a skill. The fingers and brain have to be trained to work together, just as you need to practise ball skills to succeed in that area. It is important to establish a practice routine right from the start of lessons.
  2. Your child should practise so that practising becomes a part of daily life, like brushing teeth. Even little children can be encouraged to play some pieces through each day in a fun way.
  3. Your child should practise everyday because establishing a routine is also easier for the parent to cope with. It just is – no questions.
  4. Your child should practise everyday because the amount of practice done determines the progress. But try not to watch the clock. Make practice goal-orientated.
  5. Your child should practise because not practising at all usually means an almost total lack of progress. Yes – unfortunately it is one after school activity that won’t happen by just turning up for lessons.
  6. Your child should practise to foster commitment which has a wonderful flow through into all other areas of endeavour.
Piano keys

practise means getting better and better

Parental attitude plays a big part in the progress of the child. Children are little clones of their parents until at least teens, and sometimes life long. You may not realise it but they pick up your attitudes like a sticky ball. Children will not like a piece if a parent doesn’t like it. If you want them to take music lessons but show no interest they will not be interested either.

If parents nag a child to practise but again show no interest, the child will not want to practise. Wild enthusiasm, interest and support give better results than nagging. And of course gently enforcing the practice routine.

The first thing parents should do each week is to check what their child is supposed to be practising. I write the weekly goals in a notebook. These are what should be achieved by the next lesson. But often I find the notebook has not been opened and the child has played old pieces all week. Parents can help a lot by keeping their child focused on what needs to be done.

The goals for the week are carefully chosen by the teacher to address the different aspects of learning the instrument. It might be finger training, looking for patterns in music, theory essential for playing, ear skills or improving reading skills. Challenges faced and overcome become a strength.

Left to their own devices many children will avoid aspects that they find not so interesting, thus causing weaknesses that can grow and become problems.

Practise takes effort and concentration but the results are enormous. Children can become addicted to the sheer success of hard work. Surely that can’t be all that bad! Why should your child practise regularly? Because without practice there will be no progress and they will fail to learn to play the piano. Learning to play is not just for the talented, but a wonderful achievement that anyone prepared to work can do.

Determination to Succeed

teenage girl playing pianoStudies have shown that effort, not talent lead to amazing results. 10,000 hours seems to be the magical number required for mighty achievement but steady, regular practice will lead to success.

To spend years mastering an instrument requires the child to have great determination. Support and encouragement are very necessary. Teacher, student and parent all play vital roles in the learning process.

Our greatest gift is not talent but our ability to learn.
Parents must create the desire, fuel the passion and give children the confidence that they can and will succeed.

“Quantities of quality practice can transform a person of seemingly average aptitude into a much improved and possibly outstanding performer’. Michael Griffin

Parental involvement is the key to the child’s success. To have determination the child must be excited about learning. They should also be encouraged to commit to learning for however long it takes. This is a hard lesson to learn, but a very valuable lesson crucial for achieving anything in life. The only way to learn about commitment is by committing. The piano is a very complex instrument to learn. If the child and parent are not sufficiently committed, as soon as there is the inevitable low point learning will stop. Children are learning about responsibilities in many areas. There is a requirement to complete school homework and do household chores. But parents may need to encourage their child to do these, and so it is with music. If there are family expectations for some things but not music, it gives a clear message that music learning is not important.

Children who make a long term commitment makes the greatest progress.

The parent must encourage but not criticise and look for opportunities for the child to play and perform. Once a child has tasted some success they will be unstoppable. Determination leads to success.

Recommended reading: Learning Strategies for Musical Success by Michael Griffin